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Malaria Must Die - So Millions Can Live.

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Malaria is estimated to be humanity’s oldest disease, but since 2000, modern science combined with unprecedented local and global action has delivered record progress, with malaria deaths cut by over 60%, saving almost 7 million lives. However, half the world still lives at risk from this preventable, treatable disease. Progress has slowed and could be rapidly reversed if vital support for the malaria fight is not sustained. The Commonwealth is in a prime position to lead the way, with 6 out of the top 10 cases of malaria - and half of all malaria deaths - happening in Commonwealth countries. The Malaria Summit: London 2018, taking place during the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting, will bring together global political, business and science leaders to renew global commitments to accelerate progress towards ending history’s deadliest killer. The decisionsmade now by political leaders will determine this trajectory. The lives of millions of families hang in the balance.

Malaria Must Die - So Millions Can Live.

Why this matters

Malaria is still one of the world’s most devastating diseases, killing over 400,000 people a year, the majority of whom are children under five and pregnant women. Since 2000, when the world committed to protect millions of people from preventable and treatable diseases, significant investment, strong political leadership and the development and distribution of new tools have led to a marked decline in malaria cases and deaths; saving almost 7 million lives. It is a race against time to do this, because treatments are beginning to struggle against new resistance in the disease. If we don’t stop it spreading, we could be at risk from new, even more dangerous threat.

We are at a crossroads

The past decade’s success put the world on a path towards ending malaria for good. But today, that hard-earned success is fragile and uneven, halting the decline in deaths and cases and putting our tremendous progress at risk. A global focus and action is needed to build on remarkable gains (over a 60% reduction in deaths since 2000) and meet the 2020 and 2030 targets agreed by world leaders in the Sustainable Development Goals. This will need to be achieved in the face of declining political attention, plateauing global funding levels, substantial coverage gaps (for prevention, detection and treatment) and the emergence of drug and insecticide resistance. If we don’t seize the moment now

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